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Datejs - A JavaScript Date Library

  •    Javascript

Datejs is an open source JavaScript Date library for parsing, formatting and processing. Comprehensive, yet simple, stealthy and fast. Datejs has passed all trials and is ready to strike. Datejs doesn’t just parse strings, it slices them cleanly in two.

countdownjs - A simple JavaScript API for producing an accurate, intuitive description of the timespan between two Date instances

  •    Javascript

A simple JavaScript API for producing an accurate, intuitive description of the timespan between two Date instances. While seemingly a trivial problem, the human descriptions for a span of time tend to be fuzzier than a computer naturally computes. More specifically, months are an inherently messed up unit of time. For instance, when a human says "in 1 month" how long do they mean? Banks often interpret this as thirty days but that is only correct one third of the time. People casually talk about a month being four weeks long but there is only one month in a year which is four weeks long and it is only that long about three quarters of the time. Even intuitively defining these terms can be problematic. For instance, what is the date one month after January 31st, 2001? JavaScript will happily call this March 3rd, 2001. Humans will typically debate either February 28th, 2001 or March 1st, 2001. It seems there isn't a "right" answer, per se.

Exceptionless

  •    CSharp

DateTimeRange, Business Day and various DateTime, DateTimeOffset, TimeSpan extension methods.Quickly calculate if a datetime is within your hours of business. Check out our unit tests for more usage samples.

Humanizer

  •    TypeScript

Humanizer meets all your JavaScript needs for manipulating and displaying strings, dates, times, numbers and quantities. This is a port of the popular Humanizer library to JavaScript. For the most part you can just follow the documentation for Humanizer with little to no issue. See below for big differences. Name casing has been changed for JavaScript so all functions and properties start with lower case now, so instead of "Sentence casing".Transform(To.LowerCase) you use "Sentence casing".transform(Humanizer.To.LowerCase).