Displaying 1 to 20 from 30 results

grunt-contrib-cssmin - Compress CSS files.

  •    Javascript

Issues with the output should be reported on the clean-css issue tracker. Run this task with the grunt cssmin command.

postcss-font-magician - Magically generate all the @font-face rules

  •    Javascript

Font Magician is a PostCSS plugin that magically generates all of your @font-face rules. Never write a @font-face rule again. Just use the font and font-family properties as if they were magic.




react-inline - Transform inline styles defined in JavaScript modules into static CSS code and class names so they become available to, e

  •    Javascript

Note: Thanks to the new possibilities of Babel v6+, there's also my babel-plugin-css-in-js project, which works exactly the same but doesn't require a separate CLI/API. If you're using Babel for code transpilation, just put babel-plugin-css-in-js in your build pipeline. Transform inline styles defined in JavaScript modules into static CSS code and class names so they become available to, e.g. the className prop of React elements.


gradient-string - :rainbow: Beautiful color gradients in terminal output

  •    Javascript

The colors are parsed with TinyColor, multiple formats are accepted.In some cases, you may want to apply the same horizontal gradient on each line of a long text (or a piece of ASCII art).

ansi-regex - Regular expression for matching ANSI escape codes

  •    Javascript

Some of the codes we run as a test are codes that we acquired finding various lists of non-standard or manufacturer specific codes. We test for both standard and non-standard codes, as most of them follow the same or similar format and can be safely matched in strings without the risk of removing actual string content. There are a few non-standard control codes that do not follow the traditional format (i.e. they end in numbers) thus forcing us to exclude them from the test because we cannot reliably match them.On the historical side, those ECMA standards were established in the early 90's whereas the VT100, for example, was designed in the mid/late 70's. At that point in time, control codes were still pretty ungoverned and engineers used them for a multitude of things, namely to activate hardware ports that may have been proprietary. Somewhere else you see a similar 'anarchy' of codes is in the x86 architecture for processors; there are a ton of "interrupts" that can mean different things on certain brands of processors, most of which have been phased out.

supports-color - Detect whether a terminal supports color

  •    Javascript

Returns an Object with a stdout and stderr property for testing either streams. Each property is an Object, or false if color is not supported.It obeys the --color and --no-color CLI flags.