Displaying 1 to 8 from 8 results

jellyfish - 🎐 a python library for doing approximate and phonetic matching of strings.

  •    Python

Jellyfish is a python library for doing approximate and phonetic matching of strings. Written by James Turk <james.p.turk@gmail.com> and Michael Stephens.

phonix - Phonetic libray for .NET

  •    CSharp

The quickest way to get the latest release of Phonix is to add it to your project using NuGet (http://nuget.org/List/Packages/Phonix).

phonics - Phonetic Spelling Algorithms in R

  •    R

This is the R package to support phonetic spelling algorithms in R. Several packages provide the Soundex algorithm. However, other algorithms have been developed since Soundex that can also provide phonetic spelling and test phonetic similarity. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1548562. In particular, it used the Comet system at the San Diego Supercomputing Center (SDSC) through allocations TG-DBS170012 and TG-ASC150024.




clj-fuzzy - A handy collection of algorithms dealing with fuzzy strings and phonetics.

  •    Clojure

clj-fuzzy is a native Clojure library providing a collection of famous algorithms dealing with fuzzy strings and phonetics. It can be used in Clojure, ClojureScript, client-side JavaScript and Node.js.

node-soundex - Generate a soundex index for a word.

  •    Javascript

This project is Unlicensed. In other words, I don't care what you do with it. However, if you make something interesting, I would like to check it out. Well, the wiki article probably says enough. Find it here.

pyphonetics - A Python 3 phonetics library.

  •    Python

More will be added in the future. The module is available in PyPI, just use pip install pyphonetics.

smetrics - String metrics library written in Go.

  •    Go

This library contains implementations of the Levenshtein distance, Jaro-Winkler and Soundex algorithms written in Go (golang). Other algorithms related with string metrics (or string similarity, whatever) are welcome. The Wagner-Fischer algorithm for calculating the Levenshtein distance. It runs on O(mn) and needs O(2m) space where m is the size of the smallest string. This is kinda optimized so it should be used in most cases.