Displaying 1 to 20 from 114 results

randexp.js - Create random strings that match a given regular expression.

  •    Javascript

randexp will generate a random string that matches a given RegExp Javascript object. Thanks to String-Random for giving me the idea to make this in the first place and randexp for the sweet .gen() syntax.

xregexp - Extended JavaScript regular expressions

  •    Javascript

XRegExp provides augmented (and extensible) JavaScript regular expressions. You get modern syntax and flags beyond what browsers support natively. XRegExp is also a regex utility belt with tools to make your grepping and parsing easier, while freeing you from regex cross-browser inconsistencies and other annoyances. XRegExp supports all native ES6 regular expression syntax. It supports ES5+ browsers, and you can use it with Node.js or as a RequireJS module.

regexpbuilderjs - Create regular expressions using chained methods.

  •    Javascript

RegExpBuilder integrates regular expressions into the programming language, thereby making them easy to read and maintain. Regular Expressions are created by using chained methods and variables such as arrays or strings.

emoji-regex - A regular expression to match all Emoji-only symbols as per the Unicode Standard.

  •    Javascript

emoji-regex offers a regular expression to match all emoji symbols (including textual representations of emoji) as per the Unicode Standard.This repository contains a script that generates this regular expression based on the data from Unicode Technical Report #51. Because of this, the regular expression can easily be updated whenever new emoji are added to the Unicode standard.




grunt-replace - Replace text patterns with applause.

  •    Javascript

Replace text patterns with applause. Define patterns that will be used to replace the contents of source files.

matcher - Simple wildcard matching

  •    Javascript

Useful when you want to accept loose string input and regexes/globs are too convoluted.Accepts an array of input's and pattern's.

isjs - Check your data against regular expressions or known keywords.

  •    Javascript

Check your data against regular expressions or known keywords (see Keyword section). Different versions for different platforms are availible. I wrote a really short blog post about the project a while ago, which can be read at rthor.is/javascript/cross-plugin-javascript-project-isjs. Note that some code examples are out of date.

fastparse - A very simple and stupid parser, based on a statemachine and regular expressions.

  •    Javascript

A very simple and stupid parser, based on a statemachine and regular expressions.It's not intended for complex languages. It's intended to easily write a simple parser for a simple language.


scoped-regex - Regular expression for matching scoped npm package names

  •    Javascript

Returns a RegExp for matching scoped package names.Only match an exact string. Useful with RegExp#test() to check if a string is a scoped package name.

node-oniguruma - Oniguruma Node Module

  •    Javascript

Native Node bindings to the Oniguruma regular expressions library.Read all about Oniguruma regular expressions here.

patterns - Match a string against a list of patterns

  •    Javascript

Match a string against a list of patterns.The name of this module was previosuly match-patterns, but Pavel Lang have been generous to give me the patterns name on NPM. If you are looking for the previous module it have been renamed design-patterns.

regexp-clone - clone RegExps with flag preservation

  •    Javascript

clone RegExps with flag preservation

clean-regexp - Clean up regular expressions

  •    Javascript

Text of the regular expression.Flags of the regular expression.

regx - Tagged-template-string regular-expression compiler.

  •    Javascript

Tagged template string regular expression compiler. Supports multiline expressions, partials, and embedded comments.Creates a template-string tag function. Optionally accepts RegExp flags.

ansi-regex - Regular expression for matching ANSI escape codes

  •    Javascript

Some of the codes we run as a test are codes that we acquired finding various lists of non-standard or manufacturer specific codes. We test for both standard and non-standard codes, as most of them follow the same or similar format and can be safely matched in strings without the risk of removing actual string content. There are a few non-standard control codes that do not follow the traditional format (i.e. they end in numbers) thus forcing us to exclude them from the test because we cannot reliably match them.On the historical side, those ECMA standards were established in the early 90's whereas the VT100, for example, was designed in the mid/late 70's. At that point in time, control codes were still pretty ungoverned and engineers used them for a multitude of things, namely to activate hardware ports that may have been proprietary. Somewhere else you see a similar 'anarchy' of codes is in the x86 architecture for processors; there are a ton of "interrupts" that can mean different things on certain brands of processors, most of which have been phased out.