Displaying 1 to 8 from 8 results

rootkit - Linux rootkit for Ubuntu 16

  •    C

A simple Linux kernel rootkit written for fun, not evil. The rootkit was tested to work on Linux kernels 2.6.32-38 and 4.4.0-22 as provided by Ubuntu in Ubuntu 10.04.4 LTS and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS respectively, but it should be very easy to port to kernels in-between, as well as newer ones.

linux-kernel-module-cheat - Run one command, get a QEMU or gem5 Buildroot BusyBox virtual machine built from source with several minimal Linux kernel 4

  •    C

Run one command, get a QEMU or gem5 Buildroot BusyBox virtual machine built from source with several minimal Linux kernel 4.16 module development example tutorials with GDB and KGDB step debugging and minimal educational hardware models. "Tested" in x86, ARM and MIPS guests, Ubuntu 18.04 host. This is the most native setup, and therefore the best one if you are on one of the supported Ubuntu: 16.04 or 18.04.

devheart - Listen to Tux's heartbeat with this awesome Linux Kernel Module :heart:

  •    C

So, we could assume that Tux's heart are the CPUs. Now, depending on how stressed those CPUs are, Tux will feel healthy or not. See, dmesg for more information.




kernel-roulette - A kernel module written in Rust

  •    Rust

kernel-roulette is a simple Linux kernel module written in Rust and C that implements a character device driver for a virtual device. When this virtual device is read, there is a chance that the system will crash with a kernel panic *. *: It actually uses the BUG() macro to show a stack trace in dmesg, which doesn't crash the system but leaves it in a somewhat inconsistent state. If you really want it to panic replace abort() with panic_c() in src/lang.rs:31.

drbd-9.0 - LINBIT DRBD-9.0 (new-stable)

  •    C

This repository contains the Linux kernel code for DRBD9. DRBD, developed by LINBIT, is a software that allows RAID 1 functionality over TCP/IP and RDMA for GNU/Linux. DRBD is a block device which is designed to build high availability clusters and software defined storage by providing a virtual shared device which keeps disks in nodes synchronised using TCP/IP or RDMA. This simulates RAID 1 but avoids the use of uncommon hardware (shared SCSI buses or Fibre Channel).