tasty-commits - :lollipop: Simple commit message convention for easily digestible history streams

  •        6

As a visual person, I find it difficult to read through large commit history logs in binary color schemes (i.e. black / white). In order to improve readability and understandability of my commit history I started prefixing my messages with emojis in a consistent manner.

https://github.com/slurmulon/tasty-commits

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