keybindings - Remap arrow keys to ijkl and make use of caps lock

  •        84

My preferred key bindings for both Linux and Windows. Make use of caps lock, remap arrow keys to { i, j, k, l } and extra stuff.

https://github.com/madslundt/keybindings

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