docker-make - build,tag,and push a bunch of related docker images via a single command

  •        14

docker-make is a command line tool inspired by docker-compose, while docker-compose focus on managing the lifecycle of a bunch of related docker containers, docker-make aimes at simplify and automate the procedure of building,tagging,and pusing a bunch of related docker images.docker-make read and parse .docker-make.yml(configurable via command line) in the root of a git repo, in which you specify images to build, each build's Dockerfile, context, repo to push, rules for tagging, dependencies, etc.

https://github.com/CtripCloud/docker-make

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